PSP Seminar Series on Selected Topics in Digital Publishing: Metrics, New Metrics, and Their Significance

Wednesday, November 16, 2016
12 PM - 1:30 PM

The PSP Committee for Digital Innovation (CDI) is introducing another Seminar Series on Selected Topics in Digital Publishing.   

Fall Semester:
Association of American Publishers
71 Fifth Avenue (between 14th & 15th Streets)
New York, NY
Or via webinar

Dates:
Thursday, September 22nd – 12:00-1:30 pm
The Evolution of Standard Journal Metrics


Wednesday, October 19th – 12:00-1:30 pm
Altmetrics


Wednesday, November 16th – 12:00-1:30 pm
The Significance of Metrics Today: The Institutional View

The PSP Committee for Digital Innovation (CDI) is introducing another Seminar Series on Selected Topics in Digital Publishing.  

Overview: 
The environment of measuring the significance and impact of scholarly communication is changing, and the metrics to make those assessments is changing, too. As the channels for academic and scholarly publication move beyond the traditional book and journal, so, too, are spaces where scholarship is viewed, discussed, challenged, and measured. From blogs to social media like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest, assessing the reach and impact of a paper or publication is moving past the traditional metrics of downloads and citations. This seminar series will examine the current state of traditional metrics and the challenges they face, the emerging and potentially disruptive systems of alternative metrics (altmetrics), and what the consequences of this changing landscape has on real-world decision-making for funding institutions, the university, and scholars themselves. 

Thursday, September 22nd – 12:00-1:30 pm
The Evolution of Standard Journal Metrics
With the growing interest in metrics across the scholarly research and publishing community, an understanding of the evolution of journal metrics can provide important perspective.  Thomson Reuters' Journal Citation Reports has a long history and a long association with one key metric, the Journal Impact Factor (JIF).  However, the JCR contains an entire suite of metrics by which to evaluate a journal – metrics that have been developed over the years to meet evolving market needs. We will review a brief history of the JCR and key metrics advances, and discuss possible future developments in TR’s various citation tools, including InCites and Web of Science.
Speaker:
Joelle Masciulli, Head of Research Discovery, Web of Science, Thomson Reuters


Wednesday, October 19th – 12:00-1:30 pm
Altmetrics
This session will explore the alternative metric systems – “altmetrics” – that developed in response to the rise and influence of social media. Altmetrics utilize the logic of web 2.0 to supplement the already existing impact measurements and attempt to account for the impacts of digital research through social media and online platforms, such as Twitter, blogs, and other web based publishing. Their goal is to cast a wider net over the potential influences of scholarship, as expressed through the many varied outlets of the web. This leads to a number of questions – How are these altmetrics calculated? How should they be interpreted? How does one weight the value of a tweet vs. the value of a citation? How do these indicators fit into the ‘basket of metrics’ alongside established citation-based scores in such a way as to offer flexibility as well as transparency? The speakers in this talk will delve into these questions and more.
Speakers:
Euan Adie, Founder, Altmetric
Quality, attention, engagement, influence, impact - different stakeholders want different things from published research. As our shared understanding of altmetrics grows, journals, funders and providers are coming up with more nuanced uses of the data and I'll share some of them in this talk.

Andrea Michalek, Co-Found and President, Plum Analytics
Publishers are under increasing pressure —pressure to provide more services to authors, pressure to demonstrate impact of published articles and pressure to better manage issues and journals. Altmetrics can help on all of these fronts. Since 2010, when the term “altmetrics” was a Twitter hashtag to describe non-citation metrics, the field has grown up to provide real value to publishers and those they serve. Presented in a late-night talk show style, Andrea Michalek, President and Co-Founder of Plum Analytics, will present the trends in altmetrics that everyone should know about. Hint: one of them is “The Universe of Metrics is Expanding.” That is right, what is considered an alternative metric has changed a lot over the years, and now even include a new type of citation called a Clinical Citation. Come to this session to learn what that is and about more altmetrics trends.

Andrew Plume, Director of Market Intelligence, Elsevier
Measures of credit: Citation-based indicators have long been used as a proxy for measuring credit in research, especially in traditional disciplines and academic career paths. As research becomes increasingly interdisciplinary and with the rise of portfolio careers, how are measures evolving to capture the multidimensional concept of credit? In this session, we will peer into the ‘basket of metrics’ and examine both established (e.g. journal Impact Factor, author h-index) and emerging metrics (author download and readership metrics, social metrics), and how they can complement each other in a world where no single metric can rule them all.


Wednesday, November 16th – 12:00-1:30 pm
The Significance of Metrics Today: The Institutional View
Published journal research has always been the cornerstone of academic and scholarly achievement, and it is one of the most important criteria used in making decisions about funding grants and awarding tenure. As the ways of defining the impact, reach, and consequence of published research have evolved within the new landscape of social communications, have universities and funding agencies reconsidered the weight they attach to impact factor, altmetrics, and other factors when making those decisions? Representatives of those institutions speak frankly about how they evaluate publishing records today.
Speaker:
Valerie Florance, PhD, Associate Director for Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, NIH, DHHS
James Geller, PhD, Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Computer Science Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Anna Getselman, Executive Director, Health Sciences Library, Columbia University Medical Center 

To facilitate discussion and interaction, the number of attendees will be limited to 25 attendees in person.  We are also opening up the series as a webinar for those unable to travel to NYC for the course. 

Each 90-minute session, focusing on an important current issue in electronic publishing, will offer a 45-minute presentation followed by a 45-minute Q&A with discussion.  All sessions will run from 12:00 – 1:30 PM and a light lunch will be provided for those attending in person. 

These will be interactive sessions, so bring your questions for the panelists.

You can sign up for the whole series (at a discounted rate) or for an individual session.
Registration Fees:
AAP Member: $100.00 (In person or via webinar – for all 3 sessions)
AAP Member: $50.00 (In person or via webinar – for one session only)

Non-Member: $150.00 (In person or via webinar – for all 3 sessions)
Non-Member: $70.00 (In person or via webinar – for one session only)

Click on the 'Continue' button below to register.
(If you have not used our online payment system before, to register online please use your work email and your default password is Password1.  If you have a problem logging in please contact spinto@publishers.org)

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