News

View By
  • Date(descending)
  • Date(ascending)
  • Yesterday, the U.S. Copyright Office delivered a detailed response on state e-lending developments to Senator Tillis, Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Judiciary IP Subcommittee, drawing on ample precedent and concluding that a court considering the state legislation (enacted by Maryland and pending in other states) “would likely find it preempted under a conflict preemption analysis.”  In sum, preemption would mean that state e-lending legislation falls outside of the authority of the states, conflicts with the federal Copyright Act, and intrudes on the authority of the U.S. Congress to balance the copyright framework and determine the distribution of copyrighted works.

    In writing to the Register of Copyrights on May 26, 2021, Senator Tillis expressed concern that the state bills would “remove from the copyright owner the decision as to whether, in what format, and on what terms works will be made available,” and requested the opinion of the Copyright Office in its (statutory) capacity as “the expert advisor to Congress on copyright matters.”  The Senate Judiciary Committee leads public policy deliberations on both domestic and international copyright matters.

    When it comes to connecting readers to books, public lending libraries have long been essential to publishers and this relationship has not changed as library patrons seek to borrow digital as well as physical formats.  Contrary to what the state bills suggest, publishers license millions of eBook titles to libraries across the country on terms that reasonably meet the needs of local communities, while also ensuring a fair return to authors and publishers.  And, in fact, all of AAP’s largest members already choose to make eBooks available for public lending on the same day that they release them commercially—a vast array of fiction and nonfiction works.

    We hope that state legislators will heed the conclusion of the U.S. Copyright Office and find ways to support their local libraries without undermining either the Copyright Act or the publishing ecosystem.  Moreover, while the government’s preemption analysis is consistent with AAP’s testimony in recent weeks, we have also testified to constitutional and policy concerns that go well beyond that problem.  Accordingly, AAP remains deeply troubled by ongoing, coordinated lobbying efforts that seek to dictate and devalue the distribution and pricing of books in what is clearly a healthy, robust, and ever-evolving noncommercial market channel.  Such efforts are antithetical to our democracy, which depends upon a vibrant private sector publishing industry that is incentivized to create and distribute original works of authorship to the public.

    Read U.S. Copyright Office Analysis here.

    Read AAP’s prior statements here.

  • Trade (Consumer Book) Revenues Down 8.0% in June, Up 17.0% Year to Date

    The Association of American Publishers (AAP) today released its StatShot report for June 2021 reflecting reported revenue for all tracked categories, including Trade (Consumer Books), K-12 Instructional Materials, Higher Education Course Materials, and Professional Publishing.

    Total revenues across all categories for June 2021 were essentially flat, with an increase of 0.2% as compared to June 2020, coming in at $1.2 billion. Year to date revenues were up 18.1%, at $6.3 billion for the first six months of the year.

    Trade (Consumer Books) Revenues

    Trade (Consumer Books) sales were down 8.0% in June, coming in at $638.5 million, but up 17.0% year to date, with $4.1 billion in revenue.

    In terms of physical paper format revenues during the month of June, in the Trade (Consumer Books) category, Hardback revenues were down 10.2%, coming in at $203.1 million; Paperbacks were down 8.3%, with $225.2 million in revenue; Mass Market was down 26.0% to $18.2 million; and Board Books were up 13.3%, with $14.3 million in revenue. 

    eBook revenues were down 19.9% for the month as compared to June of 2020 for a total of $87.7 million. The Downloaded Audio format was up 18.5% for June, coming in at $64.8 million in revenue. Physical Audio was down 7.9% coming in at $1.7 million.

    Year to date, Hardback revenues were up 25.3%, coming in at $1.5 billion; Paperbacks were up 16.4%, with $1.4 billion in revenue; Mass Market was up 8.0% to $117.4 million; and Board Books were up 10.2%, with $80.3 million in revenue.

    eBook revenues were down 0.3% as compared to the first six months of 2020 for a total of $542.8 million. The Downloaded Audio format was up 18.4%, coming in at $378.5 million in revenue. Physical Audio was up 8.0% coming in at $10.7 million.

    Religious Presses

    Religious press revenues were down 8.9% in June, coming in at $43.7 million. 

    On a year-to date basis, religious press revenues were up 10.7%, at $333.3 million.

    Education

    During June of 2021 Education revenues were $534.1 million, up 13.3% compared with June of 2020. Year to date education revenues were $2.0 billion, up 22.3% as compared to the first six months of 2020.

    Revenues from Higher Education Course Materials were up 0.9% for the month, as compared to June of 2020, coming in at $203.0 million. Year to date Higher Education was up 15.1%, at $1.2 billion.

    PreK-12 Instructional Materials revenues were up 22.6% for June 2021, at $331.1 million. Year to date PreK-12 revenues were up 35.2%, coming in at $774.0 million. More in-depth information on PreK-12 Books and Materials Monthly is included in AAP’s PreK-12 monthly report.

    The performance of the Education categories during this month may reflect multiple factors, including rebounding business post-COVID. In addition, the percentage increase between June 2020 and June 2021 reflects the fact that school districts delayed purchases until later in the year during the pandemic.

    Professional Books

    Professional Books, including business, medical, law, technical and scientific, were down 9.3% during the month, coming in at $30.3 million. Year to date Professional Books revenues were $186.7 million, up 5.8% as compared to the first six months of 2020.

    # # #

    AAP’s StatShot

    AAP Statshot reports the monthly and yearly net revenue of publishing houses from U.S. sales to bookstores, wholesalers, direct to consumer, online retailers, and other channels. Statshot draws revenue data from approximately 1,360 publishers, although participation may fluctuate slightly from report to report. 

    StatShot reports are designed to give ongoing revenue snapshots across publishing sectors using the best data currently available. The reports reflect participants’ most recent reported revenue for current and previous periods, enabling readers to compare revenue on both a month-to-month and year-to-year basis within a given StatShot report.

    Monthly and yearly StatShot reports may not align completely across reporting periods, because: a) The pool of StatShot participants may fluctuate from report to report; and b) Like any business, it is common accounting practice for publishing houses to update and restate their previously reported revenue data. If, for example, a business learns that its revenues were greater in a given year than its reports first indicated, it will restate the revenues in subsequent reports to AAP, permitting AAP in turn to report information that is more accurate than before.

  • Trade (Consumer Book) Revenues Up 7.9% in May and 23% Year to Date

    The Association of American Publishers (AAP) today released its StatShot report for May 2021 reflecting reported revenue for all tracked categories, including Trade (Consumer Books), K-12 Instructional Materials, Higher Education Course Materials, and Professional Publishing.

    Total revenues across all categories for May 2021 were up 11.1% as compared to May 2020, coming in at $1.1 billion. Year to date revenues were up 23.4%, at $5.1 billion for the first five months of the year.

    Trade (Consumer Books) Revenues

    Trade (Consumer Books) sales were up 7.9% in May, coming in at $685.2 million, and up 23.2% year to date, with $3.5 billion in revenue.

    In terms of physical paper format revenues during the month of May, in the Trade (Consumer Books) category, Hardback revenues were up 18.7%, coming in at $252.8 million; Paperbacks were up 14.5%, with $229.9 million in revenue; Mass Market was down 15.1% to $19.2 million; and Board Books were down 4.8%, with $9.0 million in revenue. 

    eBook revenues were down 23.4% for the month as compared to May of 2020 for a total of $86.3 million. The Downloaded Audio format was up 11.9% for May, coming in at $61.3 million in revenue. Physical Audio was up 48.5% coming in at $2.1 million.

    Year to date, Hardback revenues were up 33.8%, coming in at $1.3 billion; Paperbacks were up 23.0%, with $1.1 billion in revenue; Mass Market was up 18.0% to $99.1 million; and Board Books were up 9.6%, with $66.0 million in revenue.

    eBook revenues were up 4.7% as compared to the first five months of 2020 for a total of $455.2 million. The Downloaded Audio format was up 18.4%, coming in at $313.8 million in revenue. Physical Audio was up 11.7% coming in at $9.0 million.

    Religious Presses

    Religious press revenues were down 5.3% in May, coming in at $52.5 million. 

    On a year-to date basis, religious press revenues were up 14.4%, at $289.6 million.

    Education

    During May of 2021 Education revenues were $342.7 million, up 21.5% compared with May of 2020. Year to date education revenues were $1.4 billion, up 26.0% as compared to the first five months of 2020.

    Revenues from Higher Education Course Materials were down 8.3% for the month, as compared to May of 2020, coming in at $132.1 million.  Year to date Higher Education was up 18.5%, at $980.2 million.

    PreK-12 Instructional Materials revenues were up 52.6% for May 2021, at $210.6 million.  Year to date PreK-12 revenues were up 46.5%, coming in at $442.9 million. More in-depth information on PreK-12 Books and Materials Monthly is included in AAP’s PreK-12 monthly report.

    The performance of the Education categories during this month may reflect multiple factors, including rebounding business post-COVID.  In addition, the percentage increase between May 2020 and May 2021 reflects the fact that school districts delayed purchases until later in the year during the pandemic.

    Professional Books

    Professional Books, including business, medical, law, technical and scientific, were down 18.4% during the month, coming in at $28.6 million. Year to date Professional Books were $156.5 million, up 9.4% as compared to the first five months of 2020.

    # # #

    AAP’s StatShot

    AAP Statshot reports the monthly and yearly net revenue of publishing houses from U.S. sales to bookstores, wholesalers, direct to consumer, online retailers, and other channels.  Statshot draws revenue data from approximately 1,360 publishers, although participation may fluctuate slightly from report to report. 

    StatShot reports are designed to give ongoing revenue snapshots across publishing sectors using the best data currently available. The reports reflect participants’ most recent reported revenue for current and previous periods, enabling readers to compare revenue on both a month-to-month and year-to-year basis within a given StatShot report.

    Monthly and yearly StatShot reports may not align completely across reporting periods, because: a) The pool of StatShot participants may fluctuate from report to report; and b) Like any business, it is common accounting practice for publishing houses to update and restate their previously reported revenue data. If, for example, a business learns that its revenues were greater in a given year than its reports first indicated, it will restate the revenues in subsequent reports to AAP, permitting AAP in turn to report information that is more accurate than before.

  • Trade (Consumer Book) Revenues Up 35.2% in April and 27.6% Year to Date

    June 28, 2021 — The Association of American Publishers (AAP) today released its StatShot report for April 2021 reflecting reported revenue for all tracked categories, including Trade (Consumer Books), K-12 Instructional Materials, Higher Education Course Materials, and Professional Publishing.

    Total revenues across all categories for April 2021 were up 43.7% as compared to April 2020, coming in at $994.1 million. Year to date revenues were up 27.0%, at $4.1 billion for the first four months of the year.

    Trade (Consumer Books) Revenues

    Trade (Consumer Books) sales were up 35.2% in April, coming in at $738.9 million, and up 27.6% year to date, with $2.8 billion in revenue.

    In terms of physical paper format revenues during the month of April, in the Trade (Consumer Books) category, Hardback revenues were up 49.4%, coming in at $278.6 million; Paperbacks were up 44.0%, with $250.0 million in revenue; Mass Market was up 11.9% to $18.1 million; and Board Books were up 24.0%, with $12.2 million in revenue. 

    eBook revenues were down 1.2% for the month as compared to April of 2020 for a total of $90.8 million. The Downloaded Audio format was up 17.5% for April, coming in at $63.1 million in revenue. Physical Audio was up 32.2% coming in at $2.1 million.

    Year to date, Hardback revenues were up 38.0%, coming in at $1.0 billion; Paperbacks were up 25.4%, with $901.7 million in revenue; Mass Market was up 30.1% to $79.9 million; and Board Books were up 12.5%, with $57.1 million in revenue.

    eBook revenues were up 14.5% as compared to the first four months of 2020 for a total of $368.9 million. The Downloaded Audio format was up 20.1%, coming in at $252.5 million in revenue. Physical Audio was up 3.8% coming in at $6.9 million.

    Religious Presses

    Religious press revenues were up 57.0% in April, coming in at $50.0 million. 

    On a year-to date basis, religious press revenues were up 19.9%, at $237.1 million.

    Education

    During April of 2021 Education revenues were $214.1 million, up 81.5% compared with April of 2020. Year to date education revenues were $1.1 billion, up 27.4% as compared to the first four months of 2020.

    Revenues from Higher Education Course Materials were up 96.6% for the month, as compared to April of 2020, coming in at $106.3 million.  Year to date Higher Education was up 24.1%, at $847.8 million.

    PreK-12 Instructional Materials revenues were up 68.7% for April 2021, at $107.8 million.  Year to date PreK-12 revenues were up 41.4%, coming in at $232.2 million. More in-depth information on PreK-12 Books and Materials Monthly is included in AAP’s PreK-12 monthly report.

    The performance of the Education categories during this month may reflect multiple factors, including rebounding business post-COVID, and reduced returns in Higher Ed as more students use digital/online materials (which are rarely returned). In addition, the percentage increase between April 2020 and April 2021 reflects the fact that school districts delayed purchases until later in the year during the pandemic.

    Professional Books

    Professional Books, including business, medical, law, technical and scientific, were up 39.2% during the month, coming in at $32.0 million. Year to date Professional Books were $127.9 million, up 18.4% as compared to the first four months of 2020.

    # # #

    AAP’s StatShot

    AAP Statshot reports the monthly and yearly net revenue of publishing houses from U.S. sales to bookstores, wholesalers, direct to consumer, online retailers, and other channels.  Statshot draws revenue data from approximately 1,360 publishers, although participation may fluctuate slightly from report to report. 

    StatShot reports are designed to give ongoing revenue snapshots across publishing sectors using the best data currently available. The reports reflect participants’ most recent reported revenue for current and previous periods, enabling readers to compare revenue on both a month-to-month and year-to-year basis within a given StatShot report.

    Monthly and yearly StatShot reports may not align completely across reporting periods, because: a) The pool of StatShot participants may fluctuate from report to report; and b) Like any business, it is common accounting practice for publishing houses to update and restate their previously reported revenue data. If, for example, a business learns that its revenues were greater in a given year than its reports first indicated, it will restate the revenues in subsequent reports to AAP, permitting AAP in turn to report information that is more accurate than before.

  • We applaud President Biden for appointing Lina Khan as Chair of the Federal Trade Commission, following her Senate confirmation earlier today. With a brilliant legal mind and a comprehensive understanding of antitrust issues, Ms. Kahn is the right woman at the right time to lead the agency and will be the youngest FTC Chair in history.  She has long been a thought leader in public policy, including because of her groundbreaking article, Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox, (written while still a law student).  From law school to law professor, and most recently, as counsel with the House Judiciary Committee in its ground breaking investigation, she has clearly and confidently defined the threats posed to the public by the dominant tech platforms that have come to control much of our economy and society, including Amazon’s dominance over retail sales and Google’s dominance over search.  We welcome Ms. Khan’s leadership and the important work that lies ahead.